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There are two different directions of horizontal force in two different situations. Why?

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  • $\begingroup$ Is the wall on the right slanted, or is the pic slanted? $\endgroup$ – Bob D Aug 22 '19 at 12:38
  • $\begingroup$ $F_H$ must oppose the horizontal component of $T$, Here lies the difference between the two cases. $\endgroup$ – ja72 Aug 22 '19 at 13:43
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The horizontal component of the tension force on the left digram is to the left. Therefore the horizontal component of the reaction of the hinge must be to the right in order for the sum of the horizontal components to be zero.

On the other hand, the horizontal component of the tension force on the right diagram is to the right. Therefore the horizontal component of the reaction of the hinge must be to the left in order for the sum of the horizontal components to be zero.

Hope this helps.

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Its simple;since the rod is in equilibrium along horizontal, the reaction at hinge must be opposite to the horizontal component of applied force at the free end. It's rather a simpler case, only one force. But in case of numerous forces acting , you can assume a general situation with a horizontal and vertical component. Applying equilibrium conditions should tell you if assumed direction was right. Positive answer implies correct assumption, and negative implies the opposite.

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In either case the only non-hinge force with a horizontal component is the force labeled $T$. Therefore, the horizontal component of the hinge force needs to be equal and opposite to the horizontal component of $T$.

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