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I am doing a project in which I have to flow water between two containers, which are connected at the bottom by a 1/4" hose. Remarkably, the surface water tension is such that water does not flow between the containers. I can see the water wall at the outtake of one of the containers, despite the fact that the other container is almost full with water. If I put a piece of adsorbent paper on the outtake, this brakes the surface tension and water flows well. Is there any other way to break the surface tension not requiring a chemical change of the water?. Like a design that maximizes surface?

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    $\begingroup$ Try one drop of liquid soap. Soap is a surface active agent (surfactant), and is designed specifically to dramatically lower the surface tension of water. $\endgroup$ – David White Aug 14 at 21:21
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks David. do you know any other method that does not require to change the chemistry of the water?. $\endgroup$ – Camilo Aug 15 at 0:17
  • $\begingroup$ A picture or diagram might help. $\endgroup$ – Ben51 Aug 15 at 1:22
  • $\begingroup$ @Camilo, the soap doesn't change the chemistry of water. A soap molecule is comprised of a long hydrophobic tail and a short hydrophilic head. The hydrophilic head physically associates with water and the hydrophobic tail physically associates with non-water substances (e.g., oil). The physics of this situation acts at the water surface, not on the bulk fluid. $\endgroup$ – David White Aug 15 at 3:00
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1) shape the surface of the hose outlet into a large nozzle shape, broadening the surface that has to be held by surface tension

2) or extend the hose in a bit and cut it off at a shallow angle, again increasing the area that would have to be covered

3) put a valve between the two volumes and open it slowly, such that the hose isn’t full before flow is established

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increase the diameter of the hose to 1/2".

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