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I am nowhere close to a physicist so please correct me anywhere I am wrong

From what I understand about the observer effect, when we measure one intrinsic property of an electron such as position, the mere act of observation instantly alters another property of that electron such as momentum, so we can never accurately measure both.

Continuing, the reason observing an electron changes one of these properties is because when we use electronic instruments to sense/measure these properties, we are shining light upon the electron which has enough energy itself to alter that electrons properties in that instant, so what was before the observation is different from what is observed in that moment.

So, my question is:

  1. Isn't the problem that we just don't have the technology that could sense/measure the properties of an electron without disturbing it?
  2. Theoretically if we did have such a device as the aforementioned, doesn't this mean that a particle's state is determinable and particles don't actually exist in multiple states simultaneously?
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marked as duplicate by Javier, Thomas Fritsch, WillO, David Hammen, John Rennie Aug 14 at 7:45

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