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I am doing an electrolysis experiment using this apparatusThe left side is the anode and the right side is the cathode The left side is the anode and the right side is the cathode. I am using two 9v battery in series (total 18V DC) to power my apparatus. During the experiment, I see moderate amount of bubbles on my cathode, but no bubbles on my anode, why is that? The cathode is a system of paralle wire because I want to see enough OH- pushing the neutral water molecules toward the cathode.

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Per water molecule $\mathrm{H_2O}$ there is double the amount of hydrogen than oxygen. The hydrogen ions will get discharged at the cathode whereas oxygen will be formed at the anode. The discharge should happen also at the anode (otherwise there won't be any current) but you will see less bubbles due to the above.

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    $\begingroup$ if you want to collect the gasses to see approximate production, place an inverted glass full of water (all air removed, opening below water line) above each electrode, bubbles will rise into the glass and be trapped $\endgroup$ – Adrian Howard Aug 4 at 3:01
  • $\begingroup$ @AdrianHoward Yes, this is a good idea. You should then see that you have double the amount of hydrogen than oxygen. $\endgroup$ – EuklidAlexandria Aug 4 at 3:03
  • $\begingroup$ But I see no bubbles on the anode when there are quite a few bubbles on the cathode. Does that mean the OH- did not reach the anode? $\endgroup$ – user39178 Aug 4 at 11:12
  • $\begingroup$ @user39178 They should have reached the anode. Otherwise the electrolysis would not take place. Have you tried what Adrian Howard mentioned in his comment? $\endgroup$ – EuklidAlexandria Aug 4 at 11:28

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