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I have only recently started learning about circuit components and only know about common components such as a capacitor and a little about diodes, so excuse if im not able to understand common terms but feel free to use them to answer.

Suppose you have a set of 2 batteries, is there a way to connect them so that only after a certain voltage has been met by the first battery does the second battery start? and if possible, why wouldn't such a system be used?

Sorry if my question wasnt stated clearly, but as stated by adrian Howard what i meant was "when voltage drops to a certain point, can a second, backup, power kick in"

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closed as off-topic by ahemmetter, John Rennie, Jon Custer, Kyle Kanos, ZeroTheHero Aug 8 at 12:55

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  • $\begingroup$ It's unclear what you are asking. A battery does not "start". You maybe mean that the second battery discharges only if the first one is connected to the circuit. If this is right, please reformulate your question. PS: You might wanna check "transistors". $\endgroup$ – Semoi Aug 2 at 18:57
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    $\begingroup$ This question might get better answers in electronics.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$ – ahemmetter Aug 2 at 19:35
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If you mean when voltage drops to a certain point, can a second, backup, power kick in, then yes. This setup has many applications, such as an uninterruptable power supply (UPS) for computer systems and electronics. Also most hospitals have large UPS systems with batteries and backup generators that start automatically to insure emergency power will not be lost. Some fire department stations, and even private homes have similar systems. If this is not the intent of your question please excuse me.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is exactly what my question meant to point, sorry if it wasn't stated as clearly, i am still jst a beginner learner. Thank you for clearing my query $\endgroup$ – xytyz Aug 3 at 19:26
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First, to answer your question, let's look at a generic battery socket.

enter image description here

If you've handled with general electric devices a lot(and I'll assume you have), you'll know that these batteries will be connected in serial. That is, if one battery doesn't give current, or isn't in, the others won't start giving current.

So, the thing is, although such circuit may be possible, it would just perform like a generic, cheap battery socket, only more pricey.

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  • $\begingroup$ If this wasn't your intention, tell me! I'll try my best to find if such circuit exists. $\endgroup$ – Matthew Roh Aug 2 at 18:57
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Yes, there is. Generically, such a circuit is called a voltage regulator; it senses a voltage and then adjusts itself to deliver an output voltage which the user sets in software or by a knob, and automatically holds that desired output voltage.

Voltage detection and regulation circuits like this can also be used to switch other things on or off as desired, which is a very common feature in robotics control systems. Arduino, Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone control boards are easily programmed to do this.

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