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Added reference points from photo from this article:

https://cosmosmagazine.com/physics/what-shape-is-a-photon

As you can see in the reference photo the order of intensity is highest at point A (bottom) then point B (left) then point C (right) then point D (top).

Wouldn’t this mean that the wave is longer between points A and D (the Y axis with respect to photon as in photo) than B and C (the X axis)? enter image description here

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ben Crowell, Bill N, PM 2Ring, garyp, Aaron Stevens Jul 31 at 4:04

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Please edit the question to explain what the image is about and what you're asking. I can't tell anything from the title and text of the question. Please also reduce the size of the photo by a factor of 2, otherwise it's unwieldy to scroll back and forth past it. $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Jul 30 at 22:22
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    $\begingroup$ To on @BenCrowell comments on the size, most of the picture is just black. You can do a significant amount of cropping without losing any information. $\endgroup$ – Acccumulation Jul 30 at 22:51
  • $\begingroup$ In this diagram, I could just assume that the photon is shifted to the down left side. I do not know of a way to explain this otherwise. Could you explain more to us about this "hologram"? $\endgroup$ – Matthew Roh Jul 31 at 3:41
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The intensity is not related to the wavelength if that is what you mean when you say length. The intensity is proportional to the number of photons.

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