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I was curious if there were any anti neutrino sources with a similar flux to a nuclear reactor. My current purpose does not allow for a nuclear reactor, however, any flux source with a similar flux would suffice.

This would also preferably be a device or isotope that could be used on Earth (i.e. not a solar flare).

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    $\begingroup$ Look at it this way. If there was such a source available, why would major experiments go to the hassle (and it is a hassle) of coordinating with (and sometime being located on site for even more hassle) reactors compexes? $\endgroup$ Jul 29, 2019 at 0:19
  • $\begingroup$ @dmckee : I am not sure, but maybe spallation neutron sources can produce such flux. And if this is so, the answer to your question is you don't have much less hassle with them than with nuclear reactors. $\endgroup$
    – akhmeteli
    Jul 29, 2019 at 1:10

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There are spallation neutron sources, you can probably get high antineutrino flux from decay of the neutrons they produce, but I am not sure those sources are less nastier than nuclear reactors, so stay away from them.

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For me , it seems there is a mistake : in a nuclear reactor ( or in a spallation source ) , antineutrinos do not come from free neutrons decay ( there are no free neutrons , there life time is very short before a neutron capture ) , antineutrinos are produced by a part of instantaneous beta minus decays of fission products , approx. 6 antineutrinos for one fission ( one fission , 2 fission products , 3 beta minus decays per fission product ).

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