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The reflexive motion of a binary star system causes the host star to occasionally wobble towards and away from an observer on Earth, which gives rise to an effect called relativistic beaming. This is when light becomes more concentrated in the direction of motion of the host star when viewed from an observer on Earth. In the rest frame of the star, light will be radiating isotropically (uniformly in all directions).

It is surprising to me why this effect is even considered relativistic when the host star wont be moving more than $10^3 \frac{m}{s}$ but appariantly it's true.

Can anyone explain why this effects occurs?

Thanks.

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The effect is upon the brightness of relativistic jets (including those emitted by the binaries), not upon the brightness of the accreting matter (binaries themselves).

Here's an explaination https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativistic_beaming

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