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For a reference of my level of knowledge, I have taken an undergrad electromagnetism class, and it wasn't pretty but I passed. I have a real interest in this so I don't mind doing more research.

If electromagnets can be used for the magnetic fields they generate, what if the use is a "directed" magnetic field? From what I understand if you generate a field big enough, the flux density will be high enough in planned points to have the desired strength and impart the desired force on an object.

Is it possible to create a directed magnetic field so as to concentrate the flux at one pole? Basically creating a focused point of magnetic flux, without using other magnetic fields? The point of not using other magnetic fields, is to prevent the effects of the field interacting with other electronics around it.

Below is a VERY ROUGH picture of what I am referencing. The modified field on the right only has half of the flux drawn.

enter image description here

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A good way to think about this is to imagine how you might construct the desired fields by arranging a lot of tiny bar magnets in space. Make each one as strong or as weak as you want. At every point is space, the resulting magnetic field will be the vector sum of the fields at that point from all the magnets. If you play with this concept enough, being careful to always use a vector sum, you will get a feel for why what you're hoping for probably can't be made.

The above is true for static fields. For time-varying fields you've got a bit more freedom. For example, microwaves can be focused to a volume about the size of their wavelength; and at the focus there will be a very strong (but oscillatory) magnetic field.

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