3
$\begingroup$

If two isolated charged capacitors (of different capacitance) are connected in parallel to each other they acquire a common potential. But suppose if i connect positive plate of one capacitor to negative plate of another capacitor will they still acquire a common potential or will the charge acquired by two capacitors be same as the circuit looks like that the capacitors are connected in series in which -ve plate of capacitors is connected to + ve plate of another capacitors

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Any two pieces of metal that you connect together will quickly reach the same potential. It has nothing to do with whether they're plates of capacitors or if you label them as positive or negative. $\endgroup$ – The Photon Jul 20 at 3:00
  • $\begingroup$ @ThePhoton suppose if connect 2 capacitors in series with a battery of p.d V .If they are of different capacitance they don't acquire same potential .Why is that?Even though -ve plate is connected with positive plate .Or do they acquire same pd? $\endgroup$ – Who Jul 20 at 3:03
  • $\begingroup$ The wire that connects them is at the same potential along its whole length. Be careful to distinguish the potential of a point in space from the potential difference between two points (like the two plates of a capacitor) $\endgroup$ – The Photon Jul 20 at 3:10
  • $\begingroup$ Just to clarify: are you just connecting two capacitors in series to a battery, or are you taking two isolated, charged capacitors and connecting them together but leaving the other ends of the capacitors connected to nothing? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jul 20 at 5:04
  • $\begingroup$ isolated capacitors $\endgroup$ – Who Jul 20 at 5:06
0
$\begingroup$

If positive plate is connected to negative still the process remains the same charge will flow untill two capacitor are at same potential.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

If you are asking about connecting positive to negative and negative to positive in a closed circuit with two charged capacitors, and nothing else, then you are creating a direct short which will drain both, heat the entire circuit, and may damage capacitors, and, or wires.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ yes that's what i am asking $\endgroup$ – Who Jul 20 at 8:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Who, you started your question with the example of two isolated, charged capacitors that are then connected in parallel. Note that this covers both the cases that (1) the capacitors are connected 'plus to plus, minus to minus' and (2) ' plus to minus, minus to plus'. In either case, the capacitors are connected in parallel and the result is (ideally) an instantaneous redistribution of electric charge such that both capacitors have identical voltage across. The only difference is the initial conditions. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Jul 20 at 12:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.