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If I were able to mechanically oscillate an electrically charged object at frequencies of 430-580 THz, would the object emit light?

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Yes. In fact, that's what happens with very hot objects like the atoms of light bulb filaments.

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Oscillation is defined as mechanical vibration.

You are basically asking about thermal radiation, so I will assume your electrically charged object is part of a medium.

Thermal radiation is electromagnetic radiation generated by the thermal motion of particles in matter. All matter with a temperature greater than absolute zero emits thermal radiation. Particle motion results in charge-acceleration or dipole oscillation which produces electromagnetic radiation. Thermal radiation, also known as heat, is the emission of electromagnetic waves from all matter that has a temperature greater than absolute zero.[3] It represents the conversion of thermal energy into electromagnetic energy.

Thermal energy consists of the kinetic energy of atoms and molecules in matter. All matter by definition is made up of particles with kinetic energy, and these interact. Now atoms are made up of charged particles, and the kinetic interaction between the particles creates charge acceleration and dipole oscillation.

This results in the electrodynamic generation of coupled electric and magnetic fields, resulting in the emission of photons, radiating energy away from the body through its surface boundary.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_radiation

You might be asking about a free (not in a medium) oscillating object with EM charge. As per SR, the answer is yes, the charge will emit EM radiation.

Now it is very important to understand that of your object is an elementary particle with EM charge, like an electron, then a free (in vacuum, not interacting with an external EM field) electron will not emit EM radiation. In your case, you are asking about an oscillating charge. To have oscillation, there must be a external EM field, that makes this charged object oscillate. In this case, the answer is yes, the oscillating charged object will emit EM radiation (but in this case the object is not free).

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  • $\begingroup$ I actually mean mechanical vibration. So rather than heating it up, if I'd vibrate the entire object at these frequencies $\endgroup$ – user1282931 Jul 18 at 12:53
  • $\begingroup$ @user1282931 you need to vibrate it with something. Is that an external EM field? $\endgroup$ – Árpád Szendrei Jul 18 at 13:14
  • $\begingroup$ Does that matter? Let it be a fast rotating offset weight. $\endgroup$ – user1282931 Aug 7 at 15:46
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Even a slow oscillating charged object does create light; that's how a radio antenna emits (long-wavelength) electromagnetic radiation, a kind of light. There is a radio-frequency current forced into the antenna, the current being an oscillating movement in the mobile charges in the metal of the antenna.

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