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How do we calculate force on electron, knowing that it behaves both as particle and wave.

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The force exists only within a conceptual framework which is the Classical Mechanics (CM) (including its relativistic extension). The behavior of an electron is not amenable to Classical Mechanics. One needs something else: Quantum Mechanics (QM).

Within QM, the concept of force does not play any role. The basic reason being that missing the possibility of introducing a trajectory, acceleration is not among the basic quantities the theory works with. In QM, potential energy plays a role analogous to the CM force, in the sense that it takes care of the effect of the environment on a particle.

Of course, it is always possible to use classical concepts, evaluating the gradient of the potential energy, as in CM. But the role played by such a quantity is not the same as in CM.

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  • $\begingroup$ So the concept of effective nuclear force is also delusive? $\endgroup$ – user237118 Jul 18 at 7:31
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    $\begingroup$ @user237118 Nuclear force is a misname. It is used because people are used to the language of Classical Mechanics. But there is no expression for a "Nuclear force". There are lagrangians, potential energy of interaction. But nothing like a vector nuclear force. $\endgroup$ – GiorgioP Jul 18 at 15:15
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When electron interacts with matter, it behaves as a particle.

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