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At high enough energy, particles lose coherence and are ripped apart into a Quark-gluon plasma where the individual quarks can break free of the atomic nucleus and fly around unencumbered.

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A black hole takes in mass, compresses it to a density and temperature approaching infinity in the singularity. It then re-emits this as Hawking Radiation consisting of photons. Does this mean that there is a high enough temperature/density where the Quarks and Electrons will lose their mass and decay into photons?

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  • $\begingroup$ Hawking radiation comes from the vicinity of the event horizon, nothing ever leaves the core of a black hole. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Jul 17 at 18:55
  • $\begingroup$ @PM2Ring Energy is conserved. Hawking radiation decreases the mass of the mass of the black hole. So how is it not coming from inside the black hole? I have a papers that explains Hawking Radiation as Quantum tunneling from inside the event horizon: arxiv.org/abs/1306.6380 cscanada.net/index.php/ans/article/view/… $\endgroup$ – SurpriseDog Jul 17 at 18:58
  • $\begingroup$ Please see this answer by John Rennie, which is probably the best explanation of Hawking radiation on this site. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Jul 17 at 19:09
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    $\begingroup$ If quarks could decay into photons, charge would not be conserved. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Jul 17 at 20:40
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    $\begingroup$ Hawking radiation does not consist only of photons. A black hole radiates charged particles (and other uncharged particles) as well, mainly in its final moments. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Jul 17 at 20:41
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A black hole takes in mass, compresses it to a density and temperature approaching infinity in the singularity.

Until we get a final quantization of gravity, we do not know what is happening at the singularity. Our observations go only up to the event horizon .

It then re-emits this as Hawking Radiation consisting of photons.

This is a misunderstanding of the Hawking mechanism of the black hole losing mass. The particles emitted are at the event horizon, and quantum numbers and energy are conserved, the energy needed for the escaping partner given by the gravitational field of the black hole. And this is a very slow process.

Does this mean that there is a high enough temperature/density where the Quarks and Electrons will lose their mass and decay into photons?

At the present mainstream physics, quantum numbers are conserved, and quark+antiquark can turn into photons only if their quantum numbers add up to zero, i.e.quark antiquark annihilation. This can happen if the plasma temperature is high enough, but individual quarks, electrons, neutrinos, cannot turn into photons, from quantum number conservation.

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  • $\begingroup$ > "The particles emitted are at the event horizon" --- What do you think of this paper that models Hawking Radiation as particles quantum tunneling out of the singularity? sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/… $\endgroup$ – SurpriseDog Jul 18 at 15:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Benjamin it is a model in 2+1 dimensions for charged black holes. I think the mainstream physics black holes are 3+1. $\endgroup$ – anna v Jul 18 at 17:20
  • $\begingroup$ I think they just did that to simplify the equations, but the concept should be the same. $\endgroup$ – SurpriseDog Jul 18 at 18:35
  • $\begingroup$ @Benjamin To be accepted in PRL means that the model is correct, but they made these assumptions because that is where they can calculate. Gravity has not yet been quantized rigorously,only effective theories exist, tunneling means a quantization model and this does not exist in 3+1 dimensions. They can assume whatever they want at 2+1. $\endgroup$ – anna v Jul 19 at 4:35

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