0
$\begingroup$

I am not very clear about this statement. Does that mean in every second we are consuming that much energy?

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by stafusa, Kyle Kanos, John Rennie, tpg2114 Jul 19 at 12:35

  • This question does not appear to be about physics within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ What's the source of this claim? $\endgroup$ – stafusa Jul 16 at 7:15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ No, the statement means (whether it is true or false doesn't matter) that every second the world consumes 14 trillion Joules of energy. One watt is one Joule per second. For example, on a monthly electricity bill, there will be a monthly usage listed in kilowatt hours, which is 1000 x 3600 Joules or 1000 x 3600 watt-seconds. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 16 at 7:34
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @stafusa it doesn't matter. The OP is not asking about the validity of the claim, it's a question about how the units of energy versus power work. There's no need for the OP to cite the source in this case, or to badger a new user with a distracting question. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 16 at 7:38
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh That's your interpretation of OP's question. While I agree on the need to clarify their energy/power confusion, they can very well be amazed at how large the number is. There's no need to badger an old member with unfounded criticism. :-P $\endgroup$ – stafusa Jul 16 at 7:48
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about parsing a statement about energy usage and not physics concepts. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Jul 16 at 12:42
3
$\begingroup$

A watt is a unit of power, not energy. Power is energy per unit time. Every second we use on average 14 trillion joules of energy. A joule per second is a watt.

By the way, when you divide 14 trillion watts by the roughly 7 billion humans on Earth, each human uses about 2,000 watts as a continuous average. This is an easily grasped number. (For example, one bright pre-LED light bulb continuously consumed 100 watts.)

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ And then consider those who don't have any access to electricity to then think about those who make up that difference... $\endgroup$ – user207455 Jul 16 at 6:15

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.