0
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

Everyone of us had noticed air bubbles once in his life. They are Sphere in shape. But I want to know why the are sphere in shape, instead of any other shape.

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by Aaron Stevens, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer, tpg2114 Jul 19 at 12:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Think about : largest volume for the enclosing material... also pressure is equal in all directions... $\endgroup$ – user207455 Jul 14 at 18:03
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Why sphere minimizes surface area for a given volume? $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Jul 14 at 18:08
  • $\begingroup$ why does volume matter? Soap bubbles aren't filled with soap. $\endgroup$ – JEB Jul 14 at 20:25
  • $\begingroup$ @JEB did the OP mention soap? $\endgroup$ – user207455 Jul 14 at 21:17
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ The "small" bubbles are spherical. Larger bubbles rising through a water column are definitely NOT spherical. $\endgroup$ – David White Jul 15 at 1:05
3
$\begingroup$

They are forced into a spherical shape by the pressure of water all around them, which is roughly equal on all sides, so the compressed air inside the bubble is forced into a shape which gives maximum volume for least surface area. However, bubbles are not always spherical, especially if they are very large bubbles. If you watch a wildlife programme on TV about marine or fresh water animals, you will see that the larger bubbles are often deformed by turbulence, and all bubbles gradually increase in size as they rise to the surface for the obvious reason that the nearer the surface the less the pressure.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Surface tension. Ps they can be deformed a bit by drag forces when rising up through a liquid.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think you should ellaborate this answer a little more $\endgroup$ – FGSUZ Jul 14 at 22:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.