1
$\begingroup$

Does a metal with a strong positive charge decrease its strength? According to the mainstream theory of metal bonds, free electrons form a link between lattices. If this is the case, the removal of free electrons reduces the strength of the metal. Has anyone done this kind of experiment yet?

This is an experiment to test whether a metal bond consists of free electrons. Make metal into fine wire, the thinner the better. A strong electrostatic field is added to remove the free electrons from the wire(some portion, if not all). If the mainstream theory is correct, the wire will break or its strength will be greatly reduced, because the number of free electrons in the wire decrease.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thank Qmechanic for editing. I wrote this post because I deeply doubt the idea that the free electrons are working as metal bonds. In my opinion, the connection of metal bonds is accomplished by the sub-outer layer electrons of metal atoms, and the very few of the outer layer electrons become free electrons. How many free electrons are there in the metal? This number is equal to the total number of outermost layer electrons. In the case of copper, the number of free electrons is equal to the number of atoms (each atom has one outermost electrons, that is, free electrons). $\endgroup$ – Cang Ye Jul 12 '19 at 15:57
1
$\begingroup$

Currently it is believed so. And the phenomenon that may support this idea is called a Coulomb explosion. In particular it was shown that the mechanism of sodium explosion in contact with water. Basically, what happens is that surface atoms release electrons, which results in a localized net positive charge, thus leading to a strong electrostatic repulsion.

In the experiment that you are suggesting the problem will be related to the heating of the wire due to the current flow. Given enough electrical energy one may even cause the metal to melt or even explode (given that the current density is high enough). This method is one of the easiest ways of creating metal and metal oxides nanopowders.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for comments. Static electricity does not heat the wire $\endgroup$ – Cang Ye Jul 18 '19 at 13:20
  • $\begingroup$ The very few electrons in the outermost layer are free electrons. Their numbers are not enough as valence electrons. One atom in a metal lattice connects many other atoms. How can the metal (copper, gold, etc.) with one electrons in the outer layer be enough? $\endgroup$ – Cang Ye Jul 18 '19 at 13:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.