1
$\begingroup$

What is the difference between oscillatory motion and vibratory motion.

I have read in my book that "If the amplitude of oscillatory motion is extremely small,the motion is called vibratory motion".

What is the meaning this line?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ the distinction between the two things is somewhat arbitrary. At least in the engineering world, they are the same thing- the two terms get used interchangeably. $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Jun 23 at 5:58
  • $\begingroup$ I would say oscillations are a superset to vibrations. Any vibration is an oscillation, but not vice versa. An oscillation is generally any change with time periodicity. A vibration is a mechanical periodic change of a shape around the mean shape, that may cause a periodic force wrt the surrounding. E.g a probability or a voltage can oscillate, but cannot vibrate. An atom position in a solid lattice or in a molecule oscillates, but oscillations of atoms cause vibrations of the molecular bonds or of the lattice. $\endgroup$ – Poutnik Jun 23 at 10:55
0
$\begingroup$

Let's think you pulled a tensile string from up to down just a little bit. Then you see a motion of the string (ie particles of the string go up and down) this motion is very small in amplitude ie called vibration. Now pull a tensile spring with a block under it and the spring's other end is tied and the whole system is vertical and you pull it massively. Then you see the spring going up and down massively that's called oscillation.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ So basically you want to say that a body who is changing its position about a fixed point have oscillation.But if particle of the same body have motion but hardly change the position of body then the body have vibration. $\endgroup$ – novice programmer Jun 23 at 6:09
  • $\begingroup$ @noviceprogrammer not hardly but it is changing its position literally very small ie its amplitude is same. As well the more the body is rigid the more the chances of vibration ie earthquake is a vibration too but in elastic body ie in spring the same motion which has more amplitude is oscillation. $\endgroup$ – Nobody recognizeable Jun 23 at 6:35
0
$\begingroup$

The term vibration is used mostly mechanically in space, around a equilibrium point.

Oscillation itself is a more complex phenomenon, can be used usually as a variation usually in time, but it does not have to be mechanical (it can but not only). Oscillation can be used for non-mechanical types of variations too. Whereas vibration can only be mechanical.

Thus, vibration is defined as a type of oscillation.

Vibration is basically mechanical oscillation.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.