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I'm studying analog to digital converters (ADC). I have a question about the least significant bit (LSB). If we have 10 bits and an analog range of 5 V, then the error would be $$ \frac{5}{2^{10}} = 4.9 \text{mV} \, ,$$ But there are other errors that are all included in LSB. For example, suppose that I have a 2 LSB error, now the error will be simply 10 mV approximately for all the measure that are between 512 and 1024 (2.5 V and 5 V).

Is this correct?

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  • $\begingroup$ A hint about English: only use a question mark ? at the end of a question. A statement such as "I have a question about LSB" is not a question and should not have a question mark. $\endgroup$ – DanielSank Jun 12 at 16:36
  • $\begingroup$ Consider to spell out acronyms. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Jun 12 at 17:29
  • $\begingroup$ Would Electrical Engineering be a better home for this question? $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Jun 12 at 17:30
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Errors are not included in LSB. They are shown to you as a multiple of LSB for your convenience.

Quantization error is 0.5LSB, and up to 2LSB error from non-ideal nature of ADC = 2.5LSB total error.

So in the full range (0-1023 / 0V-5V) you can expect up to 5/1024*2.5=12.2mV of error in the worst case, and 0mV in the best case.

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