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I think it is obvious why a pressure wave is produced in front of a moving object but why the rear of it should produce a wave?

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  • $\begingroup$ In these structures, the centre of pressure lies below the centre of gravity. The behaviour of fixed points in response to perturbations are same in both of the dynamical systems as they have the same bifurcation diagram. $\endgroup$ – akhil krishnan Jun 11 '19 at 8:47
  • $\begingroup$ @akhilkrishnan i don't understand what you wrote could you rephrase it with simpler terms? $\endgroup$ – veronika Jun 11 '19 at 9:06
  • $\begingroup$ The behaviour of equilibrium points are similar for both of the dynamical systems as they have, same Topological space, time symmetry, flow . The stability of these equilibrium points are determined via bifurcation diagrams. These systems are highly unstable, their behaviour could be studied via Inverted Pendulum- Hope this helps! $\endgroup$ – akhil krishnan Jun 11 '19 at 9:32
  • $\begingroup$ @veronika The fluid (water or air) gets a boost in the front when it hits the body (ship or aircraft). In the aft part, the fluid jets collide with each other, forming a turbulent wake. In both cases, the collision of fluid particles (with the body or with each other) generates waves. $\endgroup$ – Alex Trounev Jun 11 '19 at 11:00
  • $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/421813/59023 $\endgroup$ – honeste_vivere Jun 12 '19 at 14:44
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As the ship travels through the water, water flows into the low pressure region left by the stern. This is the start of the wave making process from the stern. Turbulence and wave motion occurs.

This is actually a consequence of the equation of continuity, the initial momentum of the water flow along the ship and ending up at the stern is produced by the bow wave.

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