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Take a uncharged particle. It hits a resting charged particle. Will the charged particle radiate then?

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closed as off-topic by Jon Custer, Kyle Kanos, M. Enns, stafusa, ZeroTheHero Jun 17 at 16:59

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    $\begingroup$ Could you give us some context? Why does it matter whether the projectile is uncharged? Why are you in doubt about whether there is radiation? $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Jun 10 at 20:05
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As the charged particle quickly/instantaneously accelerates from rest into motion, due to the collision, it will radiate.

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If one speaks about a neutron and a proton (or also an electron), in a collision an exchange of impulses occurs between them, minus a loss of energy.

In the sentence above there are some remarkable details:

  • It doesn't matter whether the charge or the neutral particle moves in relation to the observer, only the relative motion between them is relevant.
  • The second law of thermodynamics was based on this phenomenon; any energy exchange is accompanied by an energy loss in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The sum of impulses after collision is less that sum before collision.
  • It does not matter at all, is the particle charged or not; even for two neutrons an energy loss occurs.

Will the charged particle emit then?

It is more the case that the the energy exchange is accompanied by an energy loss.

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