0
$\begingroup$

If a circular particle accelerator were placed on a "frictionless" turntable and then turned on, would it spin opposite to the motion of the accelerating particles?

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by Bob D, Thomas Fritsch, GiorgioP, tpg2114 Jun 8 at 22:16

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework-like questions should ask about a specific physics concept and show some effort to work through the problem. We want our questions to be useful to the broader community, and to future users. See our meta site for more guidance on how to edit your question to make it better" – Bob D, Thomas Fritsch, GiorgioP, tpg2114
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

0
$\begingroup$

It depends on the type of accelerator. The standard image you see have a circular track and particles going one way. As it accelerates them, by conservation of angular momentum it ought to rotate in the opposite direction on the turntable. It would be going slowly, since the mass of the accelerator is a lot higher than the beam, despite the speed.

However, accelerators like LHC use counter-rotating beams going in opposite directions (much easier to make them intersect and produce collisions). This means that the total angular momentum is zero: the LHC would not turn on the turntable.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.