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Can there be friction between two contracting surfaces even if they do not slide over each other?

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    $\begingroup$ Define "slide over each other" $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Jun 2 at 11:19
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    $\begingroup$ Neil, I'm not trying to be nitpicky, but did you mean "contacting surfaces" rather than "contracting surfaces"? $\endgroup$ – David White Jun 2 at 15:54
  • $\begingroup$ It's partly a matter of definitions. There can be a force along a static interface, associated with the amount of roughness and the size of the normal force and things like that, and such a force is commonly called static friction. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Steane Jun 2 at 18:06
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Yes. This is called static friction. It is a force that opposes relative motion between two surfaces in contact when the surfaces are not already moving past each other. You can easily test this by trying to push a book across a table. If your pushing force is small enough then the book will not move. The force opposing your applied force is the static friction force.

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As far as I know , the answer is no , however if anyone can point out some exception it will be curious.Friction is a force which opposes the relative motion between two surfaces , when there is no relative motion there is no friction either.
Friction is a self adjusting force , a body won't start moving as soon as a force is applied on it i.e till the force crosses the threshold of limiting friction , before that threshold is reached friction should always be equal and opposite to applied force , since you are applying no force there will be no friction consequently

edit-The emphatic NO in the above answer was written in context to kinetic friction and a scenario in which no external force is being applied on the object , if however a force is applied and the body still does not move , then there must be a force which stops it , that force is static friction which adjusts itself till a certain limit.

sorry for misunderstanding.

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  • $\begingroup$ ahh! that's a foolish mistake , from his question I thought he was asking about kinetic friction! and a situation where no external force us being applied on the object , of course there will be frictional force when you do apply a force but the body doesn't move , it's static friction $\endgroup$ – ADITYA PRAKASH Jun 2 at 14:51

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