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I assume that dark matter is made of heavy neutrinos.But wouldnt they be converted into neutrinos with less mass throygh weak interaction?So dark matter isnt made of neutrinos.I think there is truly a new fundamental particle a fermion we havent detected yet a dark particle with 0 charge and with a magnetic moment of 0.

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  • $\begingroup$ For the three neutrinos we have, muon neutrinos don't decay into electron neutrinos; they oscillate. This is because each variety of neutrino is made up of mass eigenstates, and the heavier eigenstates don't decay into the light eigenstates. $\endgroup$ Jun 2, 2019 at 10:18
  • $\begingroup$ Yes because they have pretty much the same mass. $\endgroup$
    – Flawless
    Jun 2, 2019 at 10:21
  • $\begingroup$ And only by measurement we can understand if a neutrino is an electron neutrino,tau neutrino or muon neutrino.I am saying a hypothetical neutrino with a mass of a quark. $\endgroup$
    – Flawless
    Jun 2, 2019 at 10:23
  • $\begingroup$ There are conserved quantities in physics. This is why protons don't decay to positrons (baryon number conservation, lepton number conservation, etc..) Conserved quantities could explain why super-heavy neutrinos don't decay to standard neutrinos. $\endgroup$ Jun 2, 2019 at 10:24
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    $\begingroup$ So you've deduced your own rules for physics involving "similar particles" and "pretty much the same mass." This site answers questions using mainstream physics, in which it is believed that conservation rules (and not "having pretty much the same mass") keeps muon neutrinos from decaying into electron neutrinos. We are not going to be able to help you with your own theories of non-mainstream physics. We don't understand them; they're not the theories we learned. See the help page. $\endgroup$ Jun 2, 2019 at 10:38

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As written this isn't exactly a question but if you are trying to ask "what is dark matter made of?" then the answer is no one knows. It is an open research question.

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I assume that dark matter is made of heavy neutrinos.

Within the Standard Model there are no heavy neutrinos. A model beyond the standard model is necessary to posit heavy neutrinos.

One of the models for constituents of dark matter uses supersymmetry with R parity conservation. The lightest supersymmetric particle to which R parity conservation constrains supersymmetric parcicles to decay is called LSP, (lightest supersymmetric particle) . Various candidates depending on the specific model are proposed. These models are a matter of current research. The search for supersymmetry is going on in the LHC data.

But wouldnt they be converted into neutrinos with less mass throygh weak interaction

No, the LSP cannot decay because of R parity conservation, by construction of the model because it is needed to explain dark matter.

Supersymmetry is beyond the standard model, and also beyond current observations. The LSP will be a new particle, if it is seen in experiments.

Everything about dark matter is under research.

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  • $\begingroup$ The susy partners of neutrinos are (scalar) sneutrinos. The (fermion) neutralinos are susy partners for the neutral weak gauge bosons ($W^0$ and $B$) and higgses. $\endgroup$ Jun 2, 2019 at 7:39
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidSchaich thanks for the correction $\endgroup$
    – anna v
    Jun 2, 2019 at 9:31
  • $\begingroup$ But neutralinos are bosons.They are force carriers. $\endgroup$
    – Flawless
    Jun 2, 2019 at 9:43
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    $\begingroup$ @Flawless Neutralinos are fermions. You can start learning about them at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutralino though I recommend that you don't stop there. $\endgroup$ Jun 2, 2019 at 12:11
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    $\begingroup$ @Flawless as david corrected me, it is the sneutrino that is the boson partner of the neutrino. read his comment where he corrected me. $\endgroup$
    – anna v
    Jun 2, 2019 at 13:02

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