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I've heard the fact wet air contains more oxygen is the reason experts recommend to humidify the air. Intuitively, I'd say wet air should contain water of a greater density and thus, make less space for other substances like oxygen. So (why) would wet air contain more oxygen?

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    $\begingroup$ Where did you hear this, and who are these experts anyway? Without supporting evidence to address these questions, I fear the answers that will be posted are just speculation about gossip. $\endgroup$ – Jeffrey J Weimer May 18 at 20:17
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    $\begingroup$ Moist air has lower density. $\endgroup$ – Pieter May 18 at 23:47
  • $\begingroup$ To all those who commented on my answer I never said it increased free molecular oxygen only elemental oxygen and it was never meant to be “misleading”. So I have withdrawn it. $\endgroup$ – Bob D May 19 at 9:59
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Wet air does not contain more (free, molecular) oxygen, but can be subjectively more pleasant to breath than too dry air.

Wet air is effectively a mixture of dry air and water vapour, therefore content of nitrogen and oxygen is lower, if water vapour is added.

But the difference is effectively negligible.

If content of free oxygen is higher in wet air anyway, it is not because of air being wet.

It is because of other reasons, like due activity of plants, or if it is replacement of dry air with part of oxygen spent by breathing, with fresh, but wet air.

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    $\begingroup$ As far as I know, the term "elemental" is more appropriate here than "elementary" $\endgroup$ – electronpusher May 18 at 19:02
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    $\begingroup$ As not native, I seldom dispute the language. You are probably right. :-) $\endgroup$ – Poutnik May 18 at 19:05
  • $\begingroup$ Neither wet nor dry air contain free elemental oxygen - the term strictly refers to lone atoms of oxygen, also called free radicals. The term you're looking for is molecular oxygen. $\endgroup$ – Emilio Pisanty May 19 at 8:39
  • $\begingroup$ While I agree with molecular oxygen, atomic oxygen and elemental oxygen is not the same. White, red or black phosphorus are all allotropes of elemental phosphorus. $\endgroup$ – Poutnik May 19 at 8:42

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