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Please let me know if there are experiments or data that show it

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closed as off-topic by Dvij Mankad, Bill N, Jon Custer, Yashas, Kyle Kanos May 15 at 23:45

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  • $\begingroup$ If you don't know that protons are positively changed and hence repel each other, perhaps we should start with your background. $\endgroup$ – Cinaed Simson May 14 at 4:43
  • $\begingroup$ @CinaedSimson I agree with you in respect to the OP's background, but I think your comment could be more constructive... Maybe recommend a text or online resource. Also note that the OP is a new user and as SE reminds us in these cases, be kind. $\endgroup$ – S V May 14 at 5:12
  • $\begingroup$ @CinaedSimson There is nothing wrong with your comment. It is kind and straight forward. $\endgroup$ – Bill N May 14 at 14:25
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Yes there is evidence that they do. For example Rutherford's experiment shows that protons repel each other (via Coulomb interaction). This is because they are positively charged particles.

There are of course, other forces involved like the strong force which is what binds nuclei together, but its range is much shorter so it is very difficult to bring them together (that is why very high temperatures and pressures are needed for nuclear fusion).

Also note that the repulsion between protons led scientists in the early 20th century to believe that it was impossible to harness energy through nuclear fission. The neutron was not known so the only possible way to catalyse fission would be to fire protons to nuclei but the Coulomb force made them think this was impossible on a large scale (the chain reaction would not be sustainable).

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