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If I could exceed the speed of light in a vacuum, would I be able to see photons that I previously emitted?

Would this be theoretically possible?

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closed as off-topic by Qmechanic May 12 at 8:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "We deal with mainstream physics here. Questions about the general correctness of unpublished personal theories are off topic, although specific questions evaluating new theories in the context of established science are usually allowed. For more information, see Is non mainstream physics appropriate for this site?." – Qmechanic
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ How can you cross a speed? Do you mean crossing a light beam? $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 12 at 5:59
  • $\begingroup$ yes, maybe the beam also.. the velocity/speed of light is 300,000 km/s. if I cross this number, such as 300,000+ km/s.. what would happen? would I see the quantum of light? $\endgroup$ – Shadman Shourov May 12 at 6:06
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    $\begingroup$ Well first from a theoretical perspective you cannot reach this speed at all, as this would require an infinite energy. There is an interesting video that show light propagation in slow motion: youtube.com/watch?v=snSIRJ2brEk $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 12 at 6:12
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    $\begingroup$ I reread your sentence, you added a plus to the speed. If your hypothesis means to go faster than the speed of light in vacuum, your hypothesis is just unrealistic and you cannot ask it here. $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 12 at 6:46
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    $\begingroup$ @Nat: the OP seemed to talk about the speed of light in the vacuum, not just the speed of light, which can be slowed down in a medium. I'm saying that because of your edit. The title is not complete, nor the rest. $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 12 at 7:44
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Apparently your comments show that you mean going faster than the speed of light in a vacuum, so the answer to your question is no, this is not theoretically possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ then i wouldn't see the quantum of light ? right? $\endgroup$ – Shadman Shourov May 12 at 7:08
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    $\begingroup$ No but only because you cannot do this experiment at all in the first place, not even in theory. $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 12 at 7:10

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