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In all the diagrams showing a near/far sighted eye, the image is formed either in front or behind the retina. But what if the person tries not to focus at the object he is looking at? What I mean is that if the person tries to focus his eye as if he was looking at an object farther than the object really is, the image will be formed on the retina(in case of near sightedness)and the reverse can be done for far sightedness, will this method work?

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  • $\begingroup$ « the image is formed either to the right or to the left of the lens » You mean at a variable distance AFTER the lens? $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 10 at 20:09
  • $\begingroup$ Oh! it's a mistake, I meant retina. $\endgroup$ – Random May 10 at 20:14
  • $\begingroup$ the muscle of the iris will fidget to retain that and slip into blurry focus again and again $\endgroup$ – Nick May 10 at 20:15
  • $\begingroup$ That's not true either way. In the case of vision disorders like the ones you mention, the image is formed at a distance from the surface of the retina, either in front or behind it. This is not about left or right. $\endgroup$ – Exocytosis May 10 at 20:17
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    $\begingroup$ Ya, I meant left or right according to the diagrams (ie. as seen from the side). $\endgroup$ – Random May 10 at 20:20
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Well that's why short sighted people can still see at all. Their vision tries to accommodate with more or less difficulty because of extra muscular and attentional effort. But there is a limit to what the will can do to compensate for an imperfect optical system.

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