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If you took two independent power supplies and set them to a sine with each power 180 degrees out of phase. The powers supplies will share a common line and the load will be equal_____________?

Do electrons flow both directions simultaneously in the common wire? Or what is happening.

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Hint: The key issue is to know the potential difference between the two power sources. In this case we can compute it.

Can you obtain the result?

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Even for one A/C power source, the electrons do not "flow". Electron drift velocity in a wire is exceedingly slow, on the order of 1 meter per hour. This means that for A/C power, electrons "wiggle" back and forth about a fixed position.

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  • $\begingroup$ Minor nitpick: since the OP doesn't specify a frequency, there is at least the possibility of a very low frequency sinusoidal power supply such that the "wiggle" back and forth isn't actually the case. $\endgroup$
    – Hal Hollis
    May 3, 2019 at 2:24
  • $\begingroup$ This thought got started thinking about how the energy in 3 phase moves between the wires. $\endgroup$
    – CBuckley
    May 3, 2019 at 14:15
  • $\begingroup$ I could ask the same question with DC. I am used to seeing a picture with electrons "flowing" through the completed circuit. Like any common textbook would show. But what is acutally happing when a condutor (wire) has 2 equal and opposite loads on it. $\endgroup$
    – CBuckley
    May 3, 2019 at 14:21

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