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I was wondering if there is any interference between two lasers shot at the same time through a double slit.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Yashas, Emilio Pisanty, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer Apr 30 at 12:38

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    $\begingroup$ I think you need to expand and clarify and correct your question. "The distance between the slits is 0.02mm and the distance between the slits is less than this. " How is that possible? Green and blue ... lasers of different wavelengths? Does the radiation from the lasers cover both slits, or does each illuminate a different slit? $\endgroup$ – garyp Apr 30 at 1:59
  • $\begingroup$ Interference pattern requires a coherent source. There is no way to know if two different lasers are coherent with each other or not. $\endgroup$ – Jitendra Apr 30 at 2:01
  • $\begingroup$ The distance between the slits is 0.02mm and the distance between the slits is less than this this says that the distance between the slits is both 0.02 mm and less than this, which I don't think is what you meant. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Apr 30 at 11:36
  • $\begingroup$ @garyp I have edited my question so it is more concise? What are your thoughts? $\endgroup$ – Mgert33 May 1 at 7:56
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You refer to two lasers, one blue and one green. They will not interfere. The light received at a detector from one of the lasers will be the same whether or not light from the other laser is present.

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The constructive and destructive interference of light is a classical concept that was used to explain the wave like pattern observed. In truth photons do not cancel each other, this would be a violation of the concept of conservation of energy. What is observed in the more modern Quantum Optics explanation is that bright spots are where photons are more frequent and dark spots are where there are no photons. The wave nature of light requires that light take certain paths that are n multiples of its wavelength, Feynman theory. You would see some overlap as the photons behave quite independently based on their wavelength.

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  • $\begingroup$ The OP doesn't claim that photons cancel each other, there's no mention of photons at all. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring May 1 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ Lasers produce photons, or light, this is not an example of electrons or other particles..... $\endgroup$ – PhysicsDave May 1 at 12:24

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