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Two fixed charges $-2Q$ and $Q$ are located at the points with coordinates $(-3a,0)$ and $(+3a,0)$ respectively in the x-y plane. Show that all the points in the x-y plane where the electric potential due to the two charges is 0, lie on a circle. Find its radius and location of its Centre.

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closed as off-topic by John Rennie, Bill N, GiorgioP, Kyle Kanos, HDE 226868 Apr 29 at 19:29

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework-like questions should ask about a specific physics concept and show some effort to work through the problem. We want our questions to be useful to the broader community, and to future users. See our meta site for more guidance on how to edit your question to make it better" – John Rennie, Bill N, GiorgioP, Kyle Kanos, HDE 226868
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Physics.SE! This question will likely be closed as the policy of the site of not to answer "do-my-homework" type questions. I would recommend resubmitting your question showing your attempt at a solution and stating clearly what physics concepts you are struggling with. $\endgroup$ – Josh Hoffmann Apr 27 at 14:30
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    $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome to the Physics SE! Please note that we don't answer homework or worked example type questions. Please see this page in the site help for more on what topics you can ask about here. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Apr 27 at 14:37
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Let's understand the problem from very basics. We all know Coulomb's law which states $| F| = \frac {kqq'}{r²} $ now we can see that in the following problem you are required to find the locus of all the neutral points in the x-y plane. So let's start by calculating the force due to the charges at point $ (x,y) $. Before this let's introduce the vector form of coulomb's law which says $ F̅ = \frac {kqq'}{r³} r̂ $ hint :- you have to write the force expression at a generic point $ (x,y) $ and then equate its magnitude to zero this would generate required locus .

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    $\begingroup$ Please don't answer "do my homework for me" type questions. This isn't a homework help site and answering such questions only encourages more of these types of queries that we don't want. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Apr 29 at 11:42
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    $\begingroup$ @Kyle Kanos describing an idea and solving a question might not be the same. I didn't even perform any calculation understood! $\endgroup$ – Aditya Garg Apr 29 at 12:09

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