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The enthalpy of fusion is the heat necessary to convert 1 kg of ice to liquid water. According to Wikipedia, this heat equals 333,55 kJ/kg.

Does this heat change with the temperature or pressure and if so, are there any correlations that model this dependence?

I am really looking for experimental measurements for different temperatures and pressures. It would be nice to have an expression for the latent heat in function of pressure, temperature.

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  • $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/64031/… and physics.stackexchange.com/questions/30332/… $\endgroup$
    – exp ikx
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 7:44
  • $\begingroup$ Yes thank you for those links, but however they do not answer my question in case of fusion. $\endgroup$
    – Pieter-Jan
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 10:34
  • $\begingroup$ Are you asking for experimental measurements of the change in latent heat, or for theoretical approaches such as Kirchoff's law? $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 11:40
  • $\begingroup$ I am really looking for experimental measurements for different temperatures and pressures. It would be nice to have an expression for the latent heat in function of pressure, temperature. $\endgroup$
    – Pieter-Jan
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ It's no problem finding that information for latent heat of vaporization, since steam is so commonly used for engineering purposes. If I had my old textbooks with me, I would look through to see if any had it tabulated for fusion with the other water information. $\endgroup$
    – JMac
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 13:39

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The heat of fusion of ice needs to change with pressure because the equilibrium freezing temperature changes with pressure. The combined effect assures the entropy of a mole of water/ice a function of state, so that the integral dQ/T around a closed path on a pressure-volume diagram is zero with reversible heat exchange, the same as for a Carnot cycle. Unfortunately, I don't know how to observe this with simple lab equipment, the way you can measure the heat of fusion at ambient pressure.

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