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This may be a silly question, but I'm not sure how we see an object in front of us. If light hits the points of the object and scatters in all directions, how come we are able to form an image of the object?

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    $\begingroup$ It's only silly after you know the answer. Look up the derivation of the lensmaker's equation, and it will probably answer your question. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Apr 25 at 0:14
  • $\begingroup$ this may help hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/geoopt/lenscon.html $\endgroup$ – anna v Apr 25 at 3:55
  • $\begingroup$ What you see is what you get $\endgroup$ – Alchimista Apr 25 at 8:13
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Luckily this is the case. If the light wouldn't be scattered in all directions we all would see a different world. Some would see certain objects if they stand on the line to where the light is reflected and projected on the retina (for details, see comments above) while others would perceive completely different objects. We do all see the world differently but, in fact, it's the same world seen from different angles, and we all see the same objects but from different angles.

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