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Where can I find papers by Kepler? I am looking for his solution to the two-body problem.

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closed as off-topic by Michael Seifert, Qmechanic Apr 18 at 8:57

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    $\begingroup$ This question is more about the history of physics than about physics itself, and is probably better suited to History of Science and Mathematics. $\endgroup$ – Michael Seifert Apr 18 at 1:22
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    $\begingroup$ It's also worth noting that Kepler's entire life pre-dates what is usually thought of as the first purely scientific journal, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. So asking for "papers by Kepler" may be something of an anachronism. $\endgroup$ – Michael Seifert Apr 18 at 1:26
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    $\begingroup$ You can find Kepler's books. But what two-body problem solution are you talking about? Newtonian mechanics was not invented either during Kepler's life. $\endgroup$ – nasu Apr 18 at 3:28
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Kepler did not have a formal solution to the two body problem. The problem itself was not even defined until Newton's work on gravity developed a theoretical framework for it. All that $F = \frac {GM_1M_2}{r^2}$ stuff that Newton developed did not exist for Kepler.

Kepler did discover that observations of the motions of the planets fitted ellipses. This was an enormous contribution to science, but was not at all the same as solving the two body problem. It paved the way for discovering the two body problem and explaining Kepler's experimental hypothesis using a theoretical model (by Newton).

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