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Is there any electrostatic field around the leads of a charged capacitor? Let's take just the negative one. If I take a piece of tissue and put close to that terminal it will attract or repel the paper? And if not, why?

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Since each lead of a capacitor is connected to one of the plates, if the plates are charged then the leads will be charged, one positive and one negative. Since each of the leads has a net charge there will be an electric field associated with each lead.

Although the tissue paper is not a conductor, I should think the negative charges would have enough mobility to be repelled by the negatively charged lead leaving a net positive charge on the tissue for them to be attracted by the lead.

I haven't tried it. The attraction may be pretty weak, so you might have to tear the tissue into small bits if you want to carry out an experiment.

Hope this helps.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, this help. I think I have to charge that capacitor to high voltage to see some effect, that's why I cannot do an experiment. But how can I calculate something? Voltage vs. field strength at 1mm from the lead for example. The capacity also important? $\endgroup$
    – user228225
    Apr 17, 2019 at 19:18

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