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1.What is the difference between resolution and least count of a measurement?

  1. In my physics book the statement of a question is as under :

    " The time taken by a pendulum for 100 oscillations is found to be 90 seconds using a wrist watch of 1second resolution."

I don't know how to interpret this statement .

Please provide me the answers. Thank you

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" The time taken by a pendulum for 100 oscillations is found to be 90 seconds using a wrist watch of 1second resolution."

This means the accuracy of the measurement is limited by the resolution or the least count of the wrist watch. If you take a measurement that probably would be like $8.5 s$, the wristwatch would either give $8 s$, or $9 s$, since the wristwatch cannot produce decimals.

As to the difference between resolution and least count, they are kind of meaning the same thing. Resolution tells you the least value you could increment or decrement your measurement by, which is the what the least count is anyway. There could be a subtle difference to this. I am not exactly sure.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer. I have a doubt. In the solution of that question, the uncertainty in the measurement of time by the wrist watch was taken as +- 1 second. How did they use the resolution of the wrist watch as the uncertainty . $\endgroup$ – Ashok Sharma Apr 17 at 7:58
  • $\begingroup$ Ya because as I said, if the measurement of an interval was something say 4s for a 1s resolution, there would be some uncertainty in that measurement. It could be 4s itself, or it could be 4.34567s or 3.45242s (because the resolution gives an idea about the range of possible values). Here, everything is constrained by 1s (because of the least count or the resolution). So, the only thing safe to say about the measurement is to use that least count (1s) as the uncertainty. $\endgroup$ – KV18 Apr 17 at 8:24

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