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Would not the oscillation of the light wave slow down the wave? Does light travel at "c" of its net position over time, or does it travel at "c" on the wave?

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Very nice! I was asking the same answer myself on my first day of college! The answer is: the wave-like nature of light cannot be interpreted as the wavy trajectory of a corpuscolar quantum of energy.

The wave in light is the shape of the electric and magnetic fields associated with the light beam, with the photon. The photon is this wave that propagates in the space, a wave made of electric and magnetic field perturbations. The endpoints of these vector fields (when you draw them on the trajectory of the beam) trace a wavy pattern (and they are responsible for all the wave-like features of light), but the trajectory is not a wave. The trajectory is that of the beam: a straight line (or bent if there is general relativity or other very non trivial interactions).

The beam advances at the speed of light $c$, but there is nothing that is waving around it as it advances. So there is no conflict with the statement that $c$ is the maximum speed.

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