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Let's suppose to have a black hole and an accretion disk. The disk will produce a certain amount of visible light, but since for a far observer time is going faster does it mean that the observer will be able to see the light produced in a unitary amount of time by the black hole in a dilated amount of time?
For example, if the accretion disk is releasing a photon every second in a region where the time is passing 3 times slower than the observer time, will she be able to see a photon every 3 seconds?
Will the same thing happen to other types of energy?
For example, the observer throws a rock attached to a string while the rock accelerates towards the black hole is the rope close to the observer slowing down?

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He(far away) will see a photon coming every second. On his own clock. On the clock at the lightsource, he will see time pass 3 times slower, so on that clock, photons are coming every 3 seconds.

But on the observers (far away) own clock photons come every second.

It is because the clock at the accretion disk is slowed down by gravitational time dilation (realtively) compared to the clock at the far away observer, which is ticking faster (relatively).

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