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So we have a fairly good grasp of how entities behave at extremely fast speeds (visa vi relativity etc) but what about incredibly slow speeds?

I’m a Physics student and we were covering Broglie waves. We calculated our own (using our mass and a random speed) to discover that lambda was incredibly small (2X10-36)

Since such a wave wouldn’t interact with much of anything, I calculated the needed wavelength to interact with, say, a 6cm thick door. I found a I would need to move at 2.18 x 10-31 meters / second.

But what does that physically mean? Taking a less extreme case, what would it look like if something were to move at 1 picometer / second? Are there any examples?

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All it means is that it is pointless to talk about the de Broglie wavelength of humans or any other macroscopic body.

Second of all, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is pretty much useless with finding speeds primarily because the terms in that $\Delta x$ and $\Delta v$ are standard deviations.

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  • $\begingroup$ I understand that this specific application doesn’t make sense, but the more general question it led me to, about objects (of any size) moving at these incredibly slow speeds - doesn’t seem without merit. $\endgroup$ Apr 9, 2019 at 22:07

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