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I know there are a lot of perpetual motion machine designs out there, but I haven't found one that looks like this one. I will use this diagram.
Assume the entire ring is made of a superconducting "tunnel", or a tube made out of superconductors that allows a magnet to travel inside without touching the walls, as any move towards the walls would be repelled. Theoretically, without piezoelectrics, this setup could allow a magnet inside to travel along it indefinitely, as long as no air was in the tube. However, as the magnet travels along the semicircles to the right and left, it exerts a force on those sections while it turns, which can be converted to electricity through piezoelectrics. This would reduce the energy of speed of the magnet as the tracking is warped slightly, but it would continue moving in the opposite direction, meaning the force exerted on the piezoelectrics would be more than the loss of speed.
This appears to break the law of conservation of energy. Can someone disprove that, or prove that it works?

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If energy is extracted from piezoelectric components, then that means that the piezoelectric components are being deformed in some way. This means that the superconducting surface on top of them is being moved or tilted, which changes the path that the magnet takes slightly (since the magnet stays a constant height above the surface due to flux-pinning, a tilted surface would cause the magnet to be traveling slightly "uphill"). This change of path extracts kinetic energy from the magnet, making it slow down and eventually stop.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, that would reduce the speed slightly, but the energy generated would more than make up for it. See my recent edit. $\endgroup$ – Inigo Montoya Apr 1 '19 at 21:22
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    $\begingroup$ "the energy generated would more than make up for it. " why would that be? $\endgroup$ – Jasper Apr 1 '19 at 21:35
  • $\begingroup$ The object changes direction, going in the opposite direction it was previously going, which means a force was exerted on the superconducting ring at the end. That force could then be converted to electricity via the piezoelectrics, producing a positive energy output. $\endgroup$ – Inigo Montoya Apr 2 '19 at 18:48

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