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I'm thinking about the time dilation in terms of distance from the singularity, to the event horizon and outside it.

After a black hole has lost its necessary mass to maintain its singularity through hawking radiation, and explodes, it should shoot matter outwards far enough to spread out and away from the original position relative to the singularity. Is the rate at which the time dilation of space and how it will return to "outside event horizon" levels going to be linear based upon the radius from the singularity? as in the speed of light radially inwards? Would it be some non-linear function where the outer edge of the event horizon returned to normal curvature at an exponential rate towards the center?

My inclination is that the space outside the event horizon would behave differently than internal space upon exploding, atleast in terms of how drastically the curvature and time-dilation are changing.

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After a black hole has lost its necessary mass to maintain its singularity through hawking radiation, and explodes,

You have a wrong analogue, the black hole will not explode

Hawking radiation reduces the mass and energy of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation. Because of this, black holes that do not gain mass through other means are expected to shrink and ultimately vanish. Micro black holes are predicted to be larger emitters of radiation than larger black holes and should shrink and dissipate faster

"the world ends/ Not with a bang but a whimper".

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  • $\begingroup$ Okay. I was thinking that when it lost enough matter the black hole wouldn't continue shrinking but would explode. Google says the smallest yet found black hole is 3.8x the sun's mass and around 24km radius. Why would the black hole continue shrinking instead of exploding if it became smaller/lighter than the actual mass threshold of creating a black hole? $\endgroup$ – snowg Mar 31 at 14:33
  • $\begingroup$ It is the ultimate bound state( bar hawking radiation where it loses energy) bound states stay bound because they have lost energy. It would need energy for an explosion. $\endgroup$ – anna v Mar 31 at 14:37

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