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Does anyone know of an equation that I would be able to use for the force of wind acting upon a baseball? I am working on the projectile motion of a baseball with air and wind resistance. I have the equation for the force of air resistance, however, I cannot find the appropriate equation for wind?

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Wind is just the movement of air, so the projectile would just see a modified relative air velocity moving by it. Therefore, to account for wind you would just modify the terms in your equations involving air resistance (probably some function of object velocity $\mathbf f(\mathbf v)$) to take into account the relative velocity between the air and the object due to the wind. In other words you would replace $\mathbf f(\mathbf v)$ with $\mathbf f(\mathbf v-\mathbf w)$ where $\mathbf w$ is the velocity of the wind.

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  • $\begingroup$ @Eli Let us continue this discussion in chat. $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Mar 29 at 11:55
  • $\begingroup$ $$x(max)=[ [v_{0}^2*sin(2\theta)]/g]- [4v_{0}^3 sin(2\theta)sin(\theta)/3g^2]*\gamma$$ where gamma is the drag coefficient. the first equation represent the x max without air resistance so would I subtract w from v in the second equation? $\endgroup$ – Tyler Holland Mar 29 at 13:54
  • $\begingroup$ @TylerHolland I would go back to how that equation is derived using the drag force due to air and do what I describe in my answer. $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Mar 29 at 15:51
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Wind is just another force in the ballistic equation. Break the wind into two vectors. One along the direction of the baseball and the other perpendicular to the direction of the baseball.

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