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Although an electron or photon wave is meant to just diffuse and interfere, when it hits the screen in a certain diffraction pattern at the end, the particle version would be considered to have changed velocity and so lost/absorbed energy from/to the grating. Is this considered completely irrelevant?.

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  • $\begingroup$ To clarify, when a particle acts like a wave, energy interaction with the diffraction grating is nil, the wave self-interaction is purely responsible for changes in velocity and the process is completely elastic vis-a-vis the grating/particlewave (both are seperate energy systems that are closed to one another) $\endgroup$ – JKB Mar 25 at 11:19
  • $\begingroup$ I suppose I should ask - what does it take for the wave particle to interact with the grating - I would assume where it is metal there are several free-electron-like orbitals (because of metal) that the electron could enter, but is the energy of electrons in slit experiments too low i.e. they can't 'tunnel' into the metal/gratin material? $\endgroup$ – JKB Mar 25 at 11:56
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The diffraction pattern is determined by the particles that do not interact with the slit material. The ones that do are assumed be eliminated from the bundle. So you lose particle flux, not particle energy, and the precise physical interaction is not important.

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  • $\begingroup$ Are some electrons considered to have interacted with the slits and eliminated from the results? $\endgroup$ – JKB Mar 25 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ The slit system is assumed to remove any particles that are not falling on the slits. $\endgroup$ – my2cts Mar 25 at 17:06
  • $\begingroup$ Is wavelike nature suggested to be propagated by something akin to virtual particles (to sum). $\endgroup$ – JKB Mar 28 at 12:08

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