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'Change in potential energy is always equal to the negative of the work done by a conservative force.'

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    $\begingroup$ When a force acts on an object, the object doesn't know if it is attractive or repulsive. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 24, 2019 at 11:37
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    $\begingroup$ I think the definition is Change in potential energy of a system is defined as the negative of work done by internal conservative forces of the system. $\endgroup$
    – user213933
    Commented Mar 24, 2019 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ Swami: Yes, if the potential energy and work refer to the same (attractive and/or repulsive) conservative force. $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Commented Mar 24, 2019 at 14:42

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For all conservative forces. As an example, coulombic force on two like charges is repulsive still we have your statement as true and Coulombic interaction is Conservative.

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The statement is true for electrostatics, which can be repulsive. So, it's true for all conservative forces. (This statement is part of the motivation for the existence of a potential energy function, without regard to whether the force is attractive.)

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