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If we perform the double slit experiment by shoting photons covering one hole at a time, would we see equally the double slit interference?.

That is, the same set up of double slit but fire photons each time covering alternatively the holes.

Does it show interference also?

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No. Interference occurs in the double-slit experiment because the individual photons had amplitudes for each hole, and these amplitudes interfere. If you turn off one of the holes each time a photon is fired, you will not see interference. (Aside from the diffraction pattern of a single hole, of course.)

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  • $\begingroup$ You say no just like before this experiment people would say no about this interference result. If the experiment hasn't been done we shouldn't say no to something. I may be way off base and there may be experiments disproving this already, but It could be electrons are not bound by time and they can interfere with where one recently passed. Not likely, but before we knew of the double slit we would have said its result would be impossible. I'd like to see this experiment done just to rule it out, please let me know if you know of it being done. $\endgroup$ – Lukos Mar 21 at 20:05
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No. An interference pattern is observed in the double-slit experiment because the quantum trajectories of individual photons interfere with themselves when there are more than one hole. If you cover one of the holes there is no interference as shown in the image (above single slit; below double slit)

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