0
$\begingroup$

When I ask people what is the difference between more light rays diverging from a point and entering our eye and less rays diverging from a point and entering our eye.They say that more the light rays, better the clarity.

But why? Why is it that more light rays from a point mean better clarity?

To make you better understand, what I am saying.More light rays diverging from a point is B and less is A. f

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Several of your recent questions seem to carry a sub-text that "rays" are discrete and countable physical things. This may not be the best way to frame your thinking on the subject as it leads to problems in both classical and quantum interpretations of optics. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Mar 11 at 17:50
  • $\begingroup$ So do I think of rays as a stream of photons.What way do I think of rays as to better understand light. $\endgroup$ – Aditya Bharadwaj Mar 12 at 12:06
  • $\begingroup$ You should think of them as an abstraction. Rays don't exist, but they are a useful way to think, when considering some particular topics such as geometric optics. They are less useful for other problem domains, such as diffraction. $\endgroup$ – ptomato Mar 13 at 4:18
1
$\begingroup$

By "more rays enter your eye from a point", you probably mean "the point is brighter". When a scene is brighter, the pupil of your eye compensates by getting smaller so that a roughly optimum amount of light reaches your retina. When an optical system (your eye) has imperfections, reducing the size of the pupil basically rejects rays that would pass through the outer parts of your lens (where the imperfections are more likely to be). So, the image on your retina has fewer imperfections which means better focus. You can simulate this effect by looking through a pinhole at something very close: it's possible to focus clearly on an object that is otherwise too close to see clearly.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ What do you exactly mean by imperfections? $\endgroup$ – Aditya Bharadwaj Mar 31 at 4:34
  • $\begingroup$ Some examples of imperfections that would affect image clarity are: scratches, material nonuniformity, and any of the kinds of aberrations that are common to simple lens systems. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Mar 31 at 4:48
0
$\begingroup$

In general you will have more information about the object, if more photons arrive at you, the observer. The reason is simply that the world is not pixelated. So the optimal resolution, determined by the available information by photons would go down to the size of the emitting particles (i.e. atoms or molecules, washed out by different physical effects).

However you would not be able to percept that much information, as you are constrained by the resolution of your retina. As the Photoreceptors of your Retina will not send a signal which will be processed by your brain, you need several photons at each point. Thus you need a lot of photons to get a clear signal and surely there is then a correlation between available information and clarity of the observed object, until the threshold of of your receptor (your retina) is reached.

Again this goes up to the point where to many photons reach the receptor. Then you are blinded.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

More light improves the signal to noise ratio. Light becomes noisy at low intensities. Also there is always a noisy background signal.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.