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Why do popcorns make a sizzling sound after popping?

At first I thought it might be due to moisture, but according to this, that is not the case, as the water present in the corn has already converted to steam to make the popcorns pop.

Any idea why exactly does this happen?

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Some (but not all) of the water in popcorn is turned into steam when you pop it. That's what makes the popcorn pop. This steam is distributed in different places throughout the kernel. Some of the steam is released when the popcorn pops but not all of the steam is released instantly. After the kernel pops, this steam that hasn't been released yet slowly squeezes out of the popped corn. This produces the sizzling sound. Once all the steam is released or or cooled back down into liquid water then the popcorn stops sizzling.

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I've not observed that phenomenon in real life, but if it's true and you're looking for idea, there might be a physics explanation to it. When particles get excited, they tend to dissipates their energy by oscillating about a fixed equilibrium point, and this might be a reason. When a corn grain is popped, a lot of energy is released at a time, and there might be some residual energy causing some agitation up to the macroscopic scale, and the only way particles let go of that sort of energy is through vibration. A more compelling explanation might be the fact that after the massive outburst and release of energy, the corn grain was stretched out apart, and to return to its structural equilibrium shape, it shrinks and sizzles. >It's all down to release of residual energy in the aftermath of the pop.

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