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Redshift for astronomical objects is often discussed in terms of z-value which I understand to be $\dfrac{\lambda_{obsv} - \lambda_{emit}}{\lambda_{emit}}$, where $\lambda$ is the wavelength.

Is this to mean that objects with a higher z-value are younger at the time that we observe them since they are so far away that the light takes time to reach us, and thus we perceive them as they were a long time ago?

The objects at higher redshift are closer to us and thus the light has taken less time to reach us, so are we perceiving them as they were more recently?

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  • $\begingroup$ Did you perhaps mean to write "The objects at lower redshift are closer to us…"? If so, you're right. $\endgroup$ – pela Mar 5 at 23:40
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Is this to mean that objects with a higher z value are younger at the time that we observe them since they are so far away that the light takes time to reach us, and we are thus we perceive them as they were a long time ago?

Yes.

and that objects at higher redshift are closer to us and thus the light has taken less time to reach us, so that we are perceiving them as they were more recently?

If by "higher redshift" you mean a smaller value of $z$ which corresponds to redder light, then yes. As Rob Jeffries pointed out, we generally define the redshift to be $z$, and if you use this definition then the answer to this question is "no".

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    $\begingroup$ A higher redshift is a larger value of z. $\endgroup$ – Rob Jeffries Mar 5 at 22:23

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