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I was studying about Microwaves and their action on water molecules in heating up the food. This all is probably due to Microwaves have wavelength such that it can be absorbed by water molecules (am i wrong somewhere?).

So, is it not possible for so much big polymer molecules in our body like DNA to absorb Radiowaves and heat up and to damage our body. (If this is not the case. Other than this also, do Radiowaves harm us or not?)

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So, is it not possible for so much big polymer molecules in our body like DNA to absorb Radiowaves and heat up and to damage our body. (If this is not the case. Other than this also, do Radiowaves harm us or not?)

Yes, the heating effect on human tissue is possible and dangerous if the EM field is too strong. This has nothing to do with DNA mutations or ionization.

Such harmful EM field can be present near FM radio emitter antennas (VHF, very short waves) or radars (microwaves), for example. These devices are unfortunately sometimes approached by human workers even while emitting strong radiation. If a worker gets too close, he may get exposed to dangerous intensity of radiation get harmed by thermal effects of the radiation.

One of the most easily acquired harm is cataracts in eyes since they lack an efficient cooling mechanism. If the radiation is strong enough, skin/organ burns can occur.

According to http://www.arrl.org/rf-radiation-and-electromagnetic-field-safety :

At frequencies near the body's natural resonant frequency, RF energy is absorbed more efficiently, and maximum heating occurs. In adults, this frequency usually is about 35 MHz if the person is grounded, and about 70 MHz if the person's body is insulated from the ground. Also, body parts may be resonant; the adult head, for example is resonant around 400 MHz, while a baby's smaller head resonates near 700 MHz. Body size thus determines the frequency at which most RF energy is absorbed.

In populated areas, radiation due to radio transmitters or radars should be low enough to not cause such harmful thermal effects.

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  • $\begingroup$ The resonant stuff seems nonsense. "Especially"? $\endgroup$ – Pieter Mar 4 at 23:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Pieter probably not, as the current at resonance is max, so maybe it heats the most, isn't it true? $\endgroup$ – PranshuKhandal Mar 5 at 2:10
  • $\begingroup$ @Pieter i now think, resonance can be related to Microwaves as they are on resonant freq of water, similarly other Radiowaves maybe at resonant freq of our body, i just think this, isn't it possible? $\endgroup$ – PranshuKhandal Mar 5 at 2:12
  • $\begingroup$ but why are there more than one resonant frequencies for our body? $\endgroup$ – PranshuKhandal Mar 5 at 2:13
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    $\begingroup$ The resonance stuff is still nonsense. Is there something especially off-resonance at 75 MHz compared to 70 MHz or 80-100 Mhz? Is that resonance at 70 MHz very narrow (a high Q-factor)? $\endgroup$ – Pieter Mar 5 at 23:31
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UHF (Ultra High Frequencies, i.e. microwaves) would be very harmful to us, if our body was subjected to enough UHF energy: it would fry our flesh in the same way it heats up that microwavable 'Chicken Tikka Massala' that you buy from your supermarket.

Domestic microwave ovens however are designed to minimise UHF radiation leakage and thus are extremely safe.

DNA is a red herring here: our cell are designed to operate within very narrow temperature limits (see 'homeostasis'): heating above the allowed windows causes proteins to denature and cell function to cease. This is potentially more painful and lethal (to the cells) than superficial but severe burns.

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No they cant . Radio waves are EM waves with very big wavelength hence very small energy.

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    $\begingroup$ This answer can't be right. Wavelength determines energy per quantum, not total energy of an EM wave. With strong enough EM field, radio waves are dangerous. $\endgroup$ – void_ptr Mar 5 at 19:51
  • $\begingroup$ For the same amount of photons it is less energy . $\endgroup$ – Max Destiny Mar 5 at 21:22
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    $\begingroup$ And for the same energy it is more photons. Point is, radio waves would still fry you alright. $\endgroup$ – void_ptr Mar 6 at 0:40
  • $\begingroup$ I am commenting for the same number of photons. $\endgroup$ – Max Destiny Mar 6 at 6:29
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    $\begingroup$ @Max Destiny: "the same amount of photons" is the wrong metric. $\endgroup$ – Peter Shor Mar 6 at 13:39

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