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The magnetic field gradient of a ring magnet I could find online is all oriented up and down. Which means the bottom part of the ring is S or N and the top part is the other.

Field

For simplicity I made another picture depicting the "orientation" of the dipole (from S to N).

enter image description here

What would the field gradient look like if I were to change the orientation of the dipole "along" the ring!? Where there is no distinct clarification between N and S!?

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I can find plenty of sites selling multipole radial ring magnets, eg hsmagnets, but I can't find any good field line diagrams. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Mar 4 at 6:05
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First of all the arrangement of field lines in figure 3 is only possible around a current carrying wire or a moving charge.

Now if I understood your question well, I think you are asking about the arrangement of magnetic field lines around a magnetized ring.

There are two types of configurations these rings can have. The poles can be axially opposite or diametrically opposite. enter image description here

And the field lines of the diametrically magnetized ring magnet will be like enter image description here

Please note that the field lines at the contact points will always be perpendicular to the surface at that point and the field lines will always point from NORTH pole (of the magnet) to SOUTH pole outside the magnet. Inside the magnets the field lines will point in the opposite direction. Sorry I couldn't take care of these facts in my diagrams but surely, the field lines will behave like that.

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you please be so kind and explain to me why the Figure 3 arrangement can "ONLY" be possible in current carrying wire or a moving charge!? What if I take "a lot of" normal magnets (with a little taper) and make it into a ring by staking them together!? $\endgroup$ – PiggyChu001 Mar 4 at 4:07
  • $\begingroup$ yes that's possible but you can't get that circular field with a single magnet. That's what I mean. Using small magnets and suitably arranging them you can get any configuration of field lines you want. $\endgroup$ – user8718165 Mar 4 at 4:11
  • $\begingroup$ Could you explain to me why it's "impossible" to get it "with a single magnet"!? And could you please be so kind and tell me what's its field lines will look like if I stack it with small magnets!? Much appreciated!!! $\endgroup$ – PiggyChu001 Mar 4 at 5:35
  • $\begingroup$ The field lines would be as you'd expect them to be. There are certain points which you can be sure of. 1. All of them would point $N\rightarrow S$ and 2. None of them would intersect. The actual configuration can be found out using computer simulations. However it will look very clumsy. $\endgroup$ – user8718165 Mar 4 at 6:17
  • $\begingroup$ I'm sorry... I don't know what them "would be"! So I can't "expect" them! >"< $\endgroup$ – PiggyChu001 Mar 4 at 6:28

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