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The maximum density of water in its liquid form occurs at around 4°C (under normal pressure p = 1013,25 hPa). If the pressure is increased (or decreased) would the point of maximum density still be at the exact same temperature?

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  • $\begingroup$ Side note: The 4°C value is for fresh water at STP. Adding salt reduces the temperature of maximum density. Add enough (e.g., sea water) and density increases all the way down to the freezing point (which is also reduced for salt water). $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Mar 2 at 15:33
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As usual, the answer to such questions is on Martin Chaplin's water anomalies site:

"Increased pressure reduces the temperature of maximum density." http://www1.lsbu.ac.uk/water/density_anomalies.html#Pdens

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